Integrity & Access to Divine Intelligence with Thomas Meyer

The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.” ~ Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

By Catherine Austin Fitts

I used to live in a first-world country. If I picked up the phone and made a call, it went through. If someone said they would come by to pick up a package by noon, I could count on it. If a stranger came to my house, they had a social or civil purpose—something other than picking up extra cash by turning me in for a regulatory violation or reporting on my personal habits to someone who slipped them money on the digital smartphone. If I bought a package of meat or fish in the supermarket, I did not worry about whether it was real and whether or not it was safe to eat. If I went outside to ride my bike or go for a jog, I did not have to give up and come back indoors because the spraying of heavy metals was so heavy that I couldn’t exercise without coughing. Nor was I required to pretend such things were not happening to maintain my social standing.

For reasons that we cover regularly on The Solari Report, most of us are swimming in a sea of environmental, legal, regulatory, and cultural pollution. These problems, along with the explosion of new technology and technocracy around us, make it easy to become frustrated and let our standards go—acculturating to a debasement of standards.

Seeking integrity demands that we maintain a high learning metabolism; this can be time-consuming and also requires greater reliance on others to help us understand and deal with fast-unfolding developments. However, integrity is also its own reward. If we do our best to maintain integrity in our individual dealings and try to limit our dealings to people and institutions that do their best to maintain integrity, it increases our ability to access divine intelligence. In short, integrity is a pathway with which we can access a much greater power—one that the hypermaterialists and transhumanists (or subhumanists as Thomas Meyer calls them) around us cannot access. It is a power that we need—and that is ever more delightful to access in these trying circumstances.

Thomas and I discussed these issues earlier this year in our interview on the Story of Gideon. This included a discussion of the “Midianite” phenomenon—something we are watching with the Epstein affair, the suiciding of New York policemen, and mob wars breaking out across the planet.

I was just in Basel for another week with Thomas—what a privilege this was! Thomas took time out from his busy schedule publishing The Present Age, leading his fascinating circles and salons and lecturing around the world (just back from Finland, next headed to China) to speak with me about integrity. How do we nurture our integrity and that of those around us? The rewards of maintaining integrity—which I define as both competency and ethics—are significant.

I always leave my discussions with Thomas refreshed and restored.

Our Blast from the Past this week is The Future of Europe—my discussion with Thomas Meyer in early 2018.

Our movie this week is Loving Vincent—a remarkable animation of the life of Vincent Van Gogh. It is the first painted animated feature film ever made. You can read more about Van Gogh in Nina Heyn’s Food for the Soul columns covering our visit to the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam this past spring and on the Paris digital exhibit we will see in September.

Subscribers can e-mail or post questions and story suggestions for Money & Markets for this week here.

Not a subscriber yet? You are invited to join here!

Talk to you Thursday!